Edu 101 Assignment 17

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CS 101—Introduction to Computing for Engineering and Science

Neal Davis, Teaching Assistant Professor, Computer Science

Resources

Textbook & Materials

Required

Recommended

We will rely on two textbooks throughout the semester:

  • Hans Petter Langtangen, A Primer on Scientific Programming with Python, 5th ed. (2016). ISBN: 9783662498866.

    Library access (Please note that you can purchase this through the SpringerLink website at a reduced price from an on-campus connexion.)

    Book website

  • Stormy Attaway, MATLAB: A Practical Introduction to Programming and Problem Solving, 4th ed. (2016) ISBN: 9780128045251

    Library access

    Book website

Although I encourage acquiring a hard copy of them to both support the author and provide an annotatable resource, you should at a minimum have ready access to the digital copy via an on-campus connexion.

Agenda

Assignments such as quizzes and homeworks are due at 10 p.m. on the date indicated on the calendar (with the exception of materials assigned before the course add deadline; these are due on Wednesday, January 31).

Labs are due at the end of your lab section. The final exam () is a regular exam for our purposes, and will be available at CBTF from Thu May 3–Tue May 8.

N.B. Most links to materials are not available ahead of their corresponding lecture.

Labs

Office Hours

Office hours will be held in L520Digital Computer Laboratory.

Office hours will begin on January 29.

DayTimes
Mon
Wed
Fri

The Engineering CARE Center also has tutorial hours available for CS 101.

Grading

ComponentMeansFraction of TotalGrade Basis
Attendancei>clickers20%Participation-based (–); will excuse six (1% each)
ExamsComputer-Based Testing Facility20%6 total (–); will drop one lowest (4% each)
Homeworkonline24%14 total (–); will drop two lowest (2% each)
Labsin EWS lab24%13 total (–); will drop one lowest (2% each)
Quizzesonline12%29 total (–); will drop five lowest (½% each)
Extra Credit, occasional opportunities

The official course gradebook is on Compass, but the grade for many materials may be found on RELATE or PrairieLearn before it is copied over there. Graded materials that are completed on this website (flows like quizzes and homeworks) can be viewed on your student gradebook from the menu at the top of the page. Exams, labs, and participation points are available in Compass.

Letter GradeRangeLetter GradeRangeLetter GradeRange
A+$[96⅔,100]$A$[93⅓,96⅔)$A-$[90,93⅓)$
B+$[86⅔,90)$B$[83⅓,86⅔)$B-$[80,83⅓)$
C+$[76⅔,80)$C$[73⅓,76⅔)$C-$[70,73⅓)$
D+$[66⅔,70)$D$[63⅓,66⅔)$D-$[60,63⅓)$

Policies

Students should attend the lecture and lab section for which they registered, or they will receive a zero for that lecture attendance or lab. Several assignments will be dropped in each category, and exams are available over several days. Taken together, this means that almost no exceptions should need to be made for absences. Permitted exceptional absences require proof of overriding considerations. Official proof of absence need to be in forms of doctor's note or letter provided by an authority that clearly states that the purpose of the letter is to prove absence; examples include a doctor's note, notice of travel from an athletic team, etc.; religious or DRES-based exemptions should be handled as directed in their respective policy sections on this website. Special events may be taken into consideration only if we are contacted at least 72 hours in advance. In these exceptional cases, to request an absence, students shall email course administration cs101admin@cs.illinois.edu. If the request is for a lab absence, the TA of the lab section should also be cc'd.

When a student has a permitted absence for lab, make-up labs will be arranged. Make-up labs will be held in office hours under supervision of a course TA.

Cheating not only robs you of an opportunity to learn, it also devalues your peers' hard work. Because of this, we take cheating very seriously in this course. The first case of cheating will result in a zero on the assignment or exam. The second case of cheating will result in a zero for the course. We will also report instances of cheating to the college and to your department.

Plagiarism is also very easy to detect in a programming class. Do not take shortcuts. Always do your own work. Note that we encourage discussion on course content. However, please write answers/codes to homework and lab assignments on your own (unless in some labs when you are instructed by your TA to complete assignments in pairs or groups).

Although an unpleasant evantuality to ponder, the truth is that we are at the center of campus and if anything ever happens during the day it will likely be near Foellinger Auditorium. The Run–Hide–Fight policy outlines what we should do as an aggregate body in the event of an attack occurring on campus; viz., run (escape the building), hide (hide within the building or nearby), or fight (if possible). The emergency plan for Foellinger Auditorium includes evacuation to the southwest corner of the building (please note that the second page is the ground floor).

Illinois law requires the University to reasonably accommodate its students’ religious beliefs, observances, and practices in regard to admissions, class attendance, and the scheduling of examinations and work requirements. This policy outlines the procedure that students should follow in requesting an accommodation. The policy attempts to strike a reasonable balance between accommodating religious observances of students and meeting the academic needs and standards of the University. Please complete the Request for Accommodation for Religious Observances form (warning: DOCX file). This form should be submitted by the student to the professor of the course and the Office of the Dean of Students by the end of the second week of the course in the semester in which the request applies.

To insure that disability-related concerns are properly addressed from the beginning, students with disabilities who require assistance to participate in this class are asked to contact course administration as soon as possible. Please include a copy of your DRES accommodations letter.

This course uses the College of Engineering Computer-Based Testing Facility (CBTF) for its quizzes and exams: https://cbtf.engr.illinois.edu.

The policies of the CBTF are the policies of this course, and academic integrity infractions related to the CBTF are infractions in this course.

If you have accommodations identified by the Division of Rehabilitation-Education Services (DRES) for exams, please take your Letter of Accomodation (LOA) to the CBTF proctors in person before you make your first exam reservation. The proctors will advise you as to whether the CBTF provides your accommodations or whether you will need to make other arrangements with your instructor.

Any problem with testing in the CBTF must be reported to CBTF staff at the time the problem occurs. If you do not inform a proctor of a problem during the test then you forfeit all rights to redress.

Syllabus

Description. This course surveys the most important algorithms and data structures in use on computers today. Particular emphasis is given to algorithms for sorting, searching, graphs, and strings. The course concentrates on developing implementations, understanding their performance characteristics, and estimating their potential effectiveness in applications.

Prerequisites. COS 126 or ISC 231–234 or approval by the COS placement officer.

Lectures. Class meetings are 11–12:20pm on Mondays and Wednesdays in Friend 101. Laptops, tablets, and phones are prohibited, except for activities directly related to lecture, such as viewing lecture slides and taking notes.

Precepts. Precepts meet once per week and cover details pertinent to programming assignments, quizzes, and exams. Come prepared to participate in the discussion, not just ask questions.

Course staff.

The staff is complemented by a team of Undergraduate Course Assistants. (Abigail P. Rettew, Adrian Tong, Cathleen Kong, Mick Sornwanee, Katherine Xiao, Georgy Noarov, William Li, Ariel Chen, Claire Du, Gabriel Birman, Ilene E, Matthew Yi, Shiye Su, Bill Dong, June Ho Park, Tan Shanker, Elizabeth Tian, Usama Bin Shafqat, Jennifer Yin, Rebecca Barber, Gary Hu, Allison Chang, Alexandra S. Palocz, Audrey C. Cheng, Bill Zhang, David Todd, Henry T. Wang, John Hallman, Kevin Jeon)

Office hours. You are welcome to attend the office hours of any staff member. Office hours start Feb 5.

TIMEROOMPERSONOFFICEHOURS
L01M W
11–12:20pm
Friend 101Mark
Braverman
CS
411
Weds
11-noon (when
there is no class meeting)
4-5pm
P01Th
9–9:50am
Friend 009Maia
Ginsburg
Lewis
122
Sun
3:00-5:00pm
with Carl Sun (lab TA)
P02Th
10–10:50am
Friend 009Maia
Ginsburg
Lewis
122
Sun
3:00-5:00pm
with Carl Sun (lab TA)
P02ATh
10–10:50am
Friend 108Ibrahim
Albluwi
221
Nassau St.
Mon
2:00-4:00pm
P03Th
11–11:50am
Friend 009Charlie
Murphy
Friend
010
Fri
3:00-5:00pm
P04Th
12:30–1:20pm
Friend 009Tosin
Adewale
Lewis
122
Mon
6:00-8:00pm
P04ATh
12:30–1:20pm
Friend 108Lauren PickFriend
010
Mon
4:00-6:00pm
P04BTh
12:30–1:20pm
Friend 109Shayan
Hassantabar
Friend
010
Thurs
4:30-6:30pm
P05Th
1:30–2:20pm
Friend 009Tosin
Adewale
Lewis
122
Mon
6:00-8:00pm
P05ATh
1:30–2:20pm
Friend 108Ibrahim
Albluwi
221
Nassau St.
Mon
2:00-4:00pm
P05BTh
1:30–2:20pm
Friend 109Yushan
Su
Friend
010
Sat
8:00-10::00pm
---Nayana
Nagendra
Lewis
122
To start Feb 14:
Weds
8:00-10::00pm

ASSESSMENTS

Programming assignments. The programming assignments involve applying the material from lecture to solve problems in science, engineering, and commerce.

Quizzes. The quizzes consist of two or three short questions per lecture, to ensure that you are keeping up with the material.

Exams. The in-class midterm exam is March 12. The other exam is a two part exam on April 30 and May 2.

Course grades. Your grade for the course will be based on the following components: programming assignments (35%), quizzes (10%), midterm exam (20%), final exam (30%), and precept attedance (5%).

Regrades. If you believe that your work was misgraded, write a short note describing the potential mistake; attach it to the graded work; and give it to your preceptor within two weeks of when the work was returned.

RESOURCES

Course website. This course website includes links to course content, including lecture slides, programming assignments, quizzes, and old exams.

Textbook.Algorithms, 4th edition by Robert Sedgewick and Kevin Wayne. Addison-Wesley Professional, 2011, ISBN 0-321-57351-X. The assigned readings are required.

Booksite. The booksite contains many useful resources while programming.

Lecture videos. You can access lecture videos that accompany the course textbook via Salon.

Discussion forum. The best way to ask a short question about the course materials is via Piazza, an online discussion forum where you can ask (and answer) questions.

Programming environment. You may develop your programs on any machine that you like. Here are instructions for setting up a Java programming environment under Mac OS X, Windows, and Linux.

Laboratories. Undergraduate lab TAs are available to answer general computing questions in Lewis 121 and 122. They can assist you in debugging, provided you have first made a reasonable effort to identify the bug and isolate the problem. For non-debugging questions, use Piazza or office hours.

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