Essays And Aphorisms Arthur Schopenhauer All Truth

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Arthur Schopenhauer Quotes


“Do not shorten the morning by getting up late, or waste it in unworthy occupations or in talk; look upon it as the quintessence of life, as to a certain extent sacred. Evening is like old age: we are languid, talkative, silly. Each day is a little life: every waking and rising a little birth, every fresh morning a little youth, every going to rest and sleep a little death.”

– Arthur Schopenhauer, as quoted in Counsels and Maxims, Vol. 2, Ch. 2 : Our Relation To Ourselves

Arthur Schopenhauer Quotes about Art & Music


“The effect of music is so very much more powerful and penetrating than is that of the other arts, for these others speak only of the shadow, but music of the essence.”

– Arthur Schopenhauer, as quoted in The World as Will and Representation


“The composer reveals the innermost nature of the world, and expresses the profoundest wisdom in a language that his reasoning faculty does not understand, just as a magnetic somnambulist gives information about things of which she has no conception when she is awake. Therefore in the composer, more than in any other artist, the man is entirely separate and distinct from the artist.”

– Arthur Schopenhauer, as quoted in The World as Will and Representation


“In a field of ripening corn I came to a place which had been trampled down by some ruthless foot; and as I glanced amongst the countless stalks, every one of them alike, standing there so erect and bearing the full weight of the ear, I saw a multitude of different flowers, red and blue and violet. How pretty they looked as they grew there so naturally with their little foliage! But, thought I, they are quite useless; they bear no fruit; they are mere weeds, suffered to remain only because there is no getting rid of them. And yet, but for these flowers, there would be nothing to charm the eye in that wilderness of stalks. They are emblematic of poetry and art, which, in civic life—so severe, but still useful and not without its fruit—play the same part as flowers in the corn.”

– Arthur Schopenhauer, as quoted in Parerga and Paralipomena


“The poet presents the imagination with images from life and human characters and situations, sets them all in motion and leaves it to the beholder to let these images take his thoughts as far as his mental powers will permit. This is why he is able to engage men of the most differing capabilities, indeed fools and sages together. The philosopher, on the other hand, presents not life itself but the finished thoughts which he has abstracted from it and then demands that the reader should think precisely as, and precisely as far as, he himself thinks. That is why his public is so small.”

– Arthur Schopenhauer, as quoted in Counsels and Maxims, Vol. 2 “On Philosophy and the Intellect” as translated in Essays and Aphorisms (1970), as translated by R. J. Hollingdale


“Writers may be classified as meteors, planets, and fixed stars. A meteor makes a striking effect for a moment. You look up and cry “There!” and it is gone forever. Planets and wandering stars last a much longer time. They often outshine the fixed stars and are confounded by them by the inexperienced; but this only because they are near. It is not long before they must yield their place; nay, the light they give is reflected only, and the sphere of their influence is confined to their orbit — their contemporaries. Their path is one of change and movement, and with the circuit of a few years their tale is told. Fixed stars are the only ones that are constant; their position in the firmament is secure; they shine with a light of their own; their effect today is the same as it was yesterday, because, having no parallax, their appearance does not alter with a difference in our standpoint. They belong not to one system, one nation only, but to the universe. And just because they are so very far away, it is usually many years before their light is visible to the inhabitants of this earth.”

– Arthur Schopenhauer, as quoted in Counsels and Maxims, Vol. 2 “The Art of Literature” as translated in Essays and Aphorisms (1970), as translated by R. J. Hollingdale

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Arthur Schopenhauer Quotes about Change & Pessimism


“Every man takes the limits of his own field of vision for the limits of the world.”

– Arthur Schopenhauer, as quoted in Studies in Pessimism


“There are two things which make it impossible to believe that this world is the successful work of an all-wise, all-good, and, at the same time, all-powerful Being; firstly, the misery which abounds in it everywhere; and secondly, the obvious imperfection of its highest product, man, who is a burlesque of what he should be.”

– Arthur Schopenhauer, as quoted in Studies in Pessimism


“If two men who were friends in their youth meet again when they are old, after being separated for a life-time, the chief feeling they will have at the sight of each other will be one of complete disappointment at life as a whole; because their thoughts will be carried back to that earlier time when life seemed so fair as it lay spread out before them in the rosy light of dawn, promised so much — and then performed so little.”

– Arthur Schopenhauer, as quoted in Studies in Pessimism


“There are 80,000 prostitutes in London alone and what are they, if not bloody sacrifices on the altar of monogamy?”

– Arthur Schopenhauer, as quoted in Studies in Pessimism


“Noise is the most impertinent of all forms of interruption. It is not only an interruption, but also a disruption of thought.”

– Arthur Schopenhauer, as quoted in Studies in Pessimism


“To free a man from error is to give, not to take away. Knowledge that a thing is false is a truth. Error always does harm; sooner or later it will bring mischief to the man who harbors it. Then give up deceiving people; confess ignorance of what you don’t know, and leave everyone to form his own articles of faith for himself. Perhaps they won’t turn out so bad, especially as they’ll rub one another’s corners down, and mutually rectify mistakes. The existence of many views will at any rate lay a foundation of tolerance. Those who possess knowledge and capacity may betake themselves to the study of philosophy, or even in their own persons carry the history of philosophy a step further.”

– Arthur Schopenhauer, “Religion : A Dialogue.”

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Arthur Schopenhauer Quotes about Character & Virtue


“For what is modesty but hypocritical humility, by means of which, in a world swelling with vile envy, a man seeks to beg pardon for his excellences and merits from those who have none? For whoever attributes no merit to himself because he really has none is not modest, but merely honest.”

– Arthur Schopenhauer, as quoted in The World as Will and Representation


“No doubt, when modesty was made a virtue, it was a very advantageous thing for the fools, for everybody is expected to speak of himself as if he were one.”

– Arthur Schopenhauer, as quoted in Aphorisms on the Wisdom of Life


“Pride is an established conviction of one’s own paramount worth in some particular respect, while vanity is the desire of rousing such a conviction in others, and it is generally accompanied by the secret hope of ultimately coming to the same conviction oneself. Pride works from within; it is the direct appreciation of oneself. Vanity is the desire to arrive at this appreciation indirectly, from without.”

– Arthur Schopenhauer, as quoted in Aphorisms on the Wisdom of Life Vol. 1, Ch. 4, § 2


“On the other hand, the cheapest form of pride is national pride; for the man affected therewith betrays a want of indivudual qualities of which he might be proud, since he would not otherwise resort to that which he shares with so many millions. The man who possesses outstanding personal qualities will rather see most clearly the faults of his own nation, for he has them constantly before his eyes. But every miserable fool, who has nothing in the world whereof he could be proud, resorts finally to being proud of the very nation to which he belongs. In this he finds compensation and is now ready and thankful to defend, … all the faults and follies peculiar to it.”

– Arthur Schopenhauer, as quoted in Aphorisms on the Wisdom of Life pp. 360


“Rascals are always sociable — more’s the pity! and the chief sign that a man has any nobility in his character is the little pleasure he takes in others’ company.”

– Arthur Schopenhauer, as quoted in Aphorisms on the Wisdom of Life,Vol. 1, Ch. 5, § 9


“Hatred is a thing of the heart, contempt a thing of the head. Hatred and contempt are decidedly antagonistic towards one another and mutually exclusive. A great deal of hatred, indeed, has no other source than a compelled respect for the superior qualities of some other person; conversely, if you were to consider hating every miserable wretch you met you would have your work cut out: it is much easier to despise them one and all. True, genuine contempt, which is the obverse of true, genuine pride, stays hidden away in secret and lets no one suspect its existence: for if you let a person you despise notice the fact, you thereby reveal a certain respect for him, inasmuch as you want him to know how low you rate him — which betrays not contempt but hatred, which excludes contempt and only affects it. Genuine contempt, on the other hand, is the unsullied conviction of the worthlessness of another.”

– Arthur Schopenhauer, as quoted in Counsels and Maxims, Vol. 2, Ch. 24, § 324


“Every true thinker for himself is so far like a monarch; he is absolute, and recognises nobody above him. His judgments, like the decrees of a monarch, spring from his own sovereign power and proceed directly from himself. He takes as little notice of authority as a monarch does of a command; nothing is valid unless he has himself authorised it. On the other hand, those of vulgar minds, who are swayed by all kinds of current opinions, authorities, and prejudices, are like the people which in silence obey the law and commands.”

– Arthur Schopenhauer, as quoted in Parerga and Paralipomena


“A man’s body and the needs of his body are now everywhere treated with a tender indulgence. Is the thinking mind then, to be the only thing that is never to obtain the slightest measure of consideration or protection, to say nothing of respect?”

– Arthur Schopenhauer, as quoted in Parerga and Paralipomena


“A reproach can only hurt if it hits the mark. Whoever knows that he does not deserve a reproach can treat it with contempt.”

– Arthur Schopenhauer, as quoted in Aphorisms on the Wisdom of Life


“Our moral virtues benefit mainly other people; intellectual virtues, on the other hand, benefit primarily ourselves; therefore the former make us universally popular, the latter unpopular.”

– Arthur Schopenhauer, as quoted in Aphorisms on the Wisdom of Life

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Arthur Schopenhauer Quotes about Death


“We can come to look upon the deaths of our enemies with as much regret as we feel for those of our friends, namely, when we miss their existence as witnesses to our success.”

– Arthur Schopenhauer, as quoted in Counsels and Maxims, Vol. 2, Ch. 26, sect. 311a


“Suicide may also be regarded as an experiment — a question which man puts to Nature, trying to force her to answer. The question is this: What change will death produce in a man’s existence and in his insight into the nature of things? It is a clumsy experiment to make; for it involves the destruction of the very consciousness which puts the question and awaits the answer.”

– Arthur Schopenhauer, as quoted in Counsels and Maxims


“Every parting gives a foretaste of death, every reunion a hint of the resurrection.”

– Arthur Schopenhauer, as quoted in Counsels and Maxims, Vol. 2, Ch. 26, § 310, as translated by Eric F. J. Payne


“In early youth, as we contemplate our coming life, we are like children in a theatre before the curtain is raised, sitting there in high spirits and eagerly waiting for the play to begin. It is a blessing that we do not know what is really going to happen. Could we foresee it, there are times when children might seem like innocent prisoners, condemned, not to death, but to life, and as yet all unconscious of what their sentence means.”

– Arthur Schopenhauer, as quoted in Studies in Pessimism

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Arthur Schopenhauer Quotes about Education


“The fundament upon which all our knowledge and learning rests is the inexplicable.”

– Arthur Schopenhauer, as quoted in Counsels and Maxims, Vol. 2, Ch. 1, § 1


“Opinion is like a pendulum and obeys the same law. If it goes past the centre of gravity on one side, it must go a like distance on the other; and it is only after a certain time that it finds the true point at which it can remain at rest.”

– Arthur Schopenhauer, as quoted in Counsels and Maxims, Vol. 2 “Further Psychological Observations” as translated in Essays and Aphorisms (1970), as translated by R. J. Hollingdale


“As the biggest library if it is in disorder is not as useful as a small but well-arranged one, so you may accumulate a vast amount of knowledge but it will be of far less value to you than a much smaller amount if you have not thought it over for yourself; because only through ordering what you know by comparing every truth with every other truth can you take complete possession of your knowledge and get it into your power. You can think about only what you know, so you ought to learn something; on the other hand, you can know only what you have thought about.”

– Arthur Schopenhauer, as quoted in Counsels and Maxims, Vol. 2, Ch. 22, § 257 “On Thinking for Yourself” as translated in Essays and Aphorisms(1970) as translated by R. J. Hollingdale


“Truth that has been merely learned is like an artificial limb, a false tooth, a waxen nose; at best, like a nose made out of another’s flesh; it adheres to us only ‘because it is put on. But truth acquired by thinking of our own is like a natural limb; it alone really belongs to us. This is the fundamental difference between the thinker and the mere man of learning. The intellectual attainments of a man who thinks for himself resemble a fine painting, where the light and shade are correct, the tone sustained, the colour perfectly harmonised; it is true to life. On the other hand, the intellectual attainments of the mere man of learning are like a large palette, full of all sorts of colours, which at most are systematically arranged, but devoid of harmony, connection and meaning.”

– Arthur Schopenhauer, as quoted in Counsels and Maxims, Vol. 2, Ch. 22, § 261


“Reading is merely a surrogate for thinking for yourself; it means letting someone else direct your thoughts. Many books, moreover, serve merely to show how many ways there are of being wrong, and how far astray you yourself would go if you followed their guidance. You should read only when your own thoughts dry up, which will of course happen frequently enough even to the best heads; but to banish your own thoughts so as to take up a book is a sin against the holy ghost; it is like deserting untrammeled nature to look at a herbarium or engravings of landscapes.”

– Arthur Schopenhauer, as quoted in Counsels and Maxims, Vol. 2, Ch. 22, § 261


“Buying books would be a good thing if one could also buy the time to read them in: but as a rule the purchase of books is mistaken for the appropriation of their contents.”

– Arthur Schopenhauer, as quoted in Counsels and Maxims, Vol. 2, Ch. 23, § 296a


“Patriotism, when it wants to make itself felt in the domain of learning, is a dirty fellow who should be thrown out of doors.”

– Arthur Schopenhauer, as quoted in Counsels and Maxims, Vol. 2, Ch. 21, § 255


“As the strata of the earth preserve in succession the living creatures of past epochs, so the shelves of libraries preserve in succession the errors of the past and their expositions, which like the former were very lively and made a great commotion in their own age but now stand petrified and stiff in a place where only the literary palaeontologist regards them.”

– Arthur Schopenhauer, as quoted in Counsels and Maxims, Vol. 2 “On Books and Writing” as translated in Essays and Aphorisms (1970), as translated by R. J. Hollingdale


“How very paltry and limited the normal human intellect is, and how little lucidity there is in the human consciousness, may be judged from the fact that, despite the ephemeral brevity of human life, the uncertainty of our existence and the countless enigmas which press upon us from all sides, everyone does not continually and ceaselessly philosophize, but that only the rarest of exceptions do.”

– Arthur Schopenhauer, as quoted in Counsels and Maxims


“Nature shows that with the growth of intelligence comes increased capacity for pain, and it is only with the highest degree of intelligence that suffering reaches its supreme point.”

– Arthur Schopenhauer


“A man of intellect is like an artist who gives a concert without any help from anyone else, playing on a single instrument — a piano, say, which is a little orchestra in itself. Such a man is a little world in himself; and the effect produced by various instruments together, he produces single-handed, in the unity of his own consciousness. Like the piano, he has no place in a symphony; he is a soloist and performs by himself — in soli tude, it may be; or if in the company with other instruments, only as principal; or for setting the tone, as in singing.”

– Arthur Schopenhauer, as quoted in Counsels and Maxims

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Arthur Schopenhauer Quotes about Greatness & Genius


“Great minds are related to the brief span of time during which they live as great buildings are to a little square in which they stand: you cannot see them in all their magnitude because you are standing too close to them.”

– Arthur Schopenhauer, as quoted in Counsels and Maxims, Vol. 2, Ch. 20, § 242


“Talent hits a target no one else can hit; Genius hits a target no one else can see.”

– Arthur Schopenhauer, as quoted in The World as Will and Representation


“If at times I have thought myself unfortunate, it is because of a confusion, an error. I have mistaken myself for someone else… Who am I really? I am the author of The World as Will and Representation, I am the one who has given an answer to the mystery of Being that will occupy the thinkers of future centuries. That is what I am, and who can dispute it in the years of life that still remain for me?”

– Arthur Schopenhauer


“Every child is in a way a genius; and every genius is in a way a child.”

– Arthur Schopenhauer, as quoted in The World as Will and Representation


“Fame is something which must be won; honor, only something which must not be lost.”

– Arthur Schopenhauer, as quoted in Aphorisms on the Wisdom of Life, Vol. 1. Ch. 4: Position, or a Man’s Place in the Estimation of Others


“Talent works for money and fame; the motive which moves genius to productivity is, on the other hand, less easy to determine. It isn’t money, for genius seldom gets any. It isn’t fame: fame is too uncertain and, more closely considered, of too little worth. Nor is it strictly for its own pleasure, for the great exertion involved almost outweighs the pleasure. It is rather an instinct of a unique sort by virtue of which the individual possessed of genius is impelled to express what he has seen and felt in enduring works without being conscious of any further motivation. It takes place, by and large, with the same sort of necessity as a tree brings forth fruit, and demands of the world no more than a soil on which the individual can flourish.”

– Arthur Schopenhauer, as quoted in Counsels and Maxims, Vol. 2 “On Philosophy and the Intellect” as translated in Essays and Aphorisms (1970), as translated by R. J. Hollingdale


“Men of learning are those who have read the contents of books. Thinkers, geniuses, and those who have enlightened the world and furthered the race of men, are those who have made direct use of the book of the world.”

– Arthur Schopenhauer

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Arthur Schopenhauer Quotes about Happiness


“The two foes of human happiness are pain and boredom.”

– Arthur Schopenhauer, Personality; or, What a Man Is


“There is only one inborn erroneous notion … that we exist in order to be happy … So long as we persist in this inborn error … the world seems to us full of contradictions. For at every step, in great things and small, we are bound to experience that the world and life are certainly not arranged for the purpose of maintaining a happy existence … hence the countenances of almost all elderly persons wear the expression of … disappointment.”

– Arthur Schopenhauer, as quoted in The World as Will and Representation


“There is no doubt that life is given us, not to be enjoyed, but to be overcome — to be got over.”

– Arthur Schopenhauer, as quoted in Counsels and Maxims


“Epicurus, the great teacher of happiness, has correctly and finely divided human needs into three classes. First there are the natural and necessary needs which, if they are not satisfied, cause pain. Consequently, they are only victus et amictus [food and clothing] and are easy to satisfy. Then we have those that are natural yet not necessary, that is, the needs for sexual satisfaction. … These needs are more difficult to satisfy. Finally, there are those that are neither natural nor necessary, the needs for luxury, extravagance, pomp, and splendour, which are without end and very difficult to satisfy.”

– Arthur Schopenhauer, as quoted in Aphorisms on the Wisdom of Life, E. Payne, trans. (1974) Vol. 1, p. 346


“There is no more mistaken path to happiness than worldliness, revelry, high life.”

– Arthur Schopenhauer, Our Relation to Others, § 24

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Arthur Schopenhauer Quotes about Independence & Intellect


“What now on the other hand makes people sociable is their incapacity to endure solitude and thus themselves.”

– Arthur Schopenhauer, as quoted in Aphorisms on the Wisdom of Life


“The result of this mental dullness is that inner vacuity and emptiness that is stamped on innumerable faces and also betrays itself in a constant and lively attention to all events in the external world, even the most trivial. This vacuity is the real source of boredom and always craves for external excitement in order to set the mind and spirits in motion through something. Therefore in the choice thereof it is not fastidious, as is testified by the miserable and wretched pastimes to which people have recourse. … The principal result of this inner vacuity is the craze for society, diversion, amusement, and luxury of every kind which lead many to extravagance and so to misery. Nothing protects us so surely from this wrong turning as inner wealth, the wealth of the mind, for the more eminent it becomes, the less room does it leave for boredom. The inexhaustible activity of ideas, their constantly renewed play with the manifold phenomena of the inner and outer worlds, the power and urge always to make different combinations of them, all these put the eminent mind, apart from moments of relaxation, quite beyond the reach of boredom.”

– Arthur Schopenhauer, as quoted in Aphorisms on the Wisdom of Life, E. Payne, trans. (1974) Vol. 1, pp. 329–330


“Intellect is invisible to the man who has none.”

– Arthur Schopenhauer, Our Relation to Others, § 23

 

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Arthur Schopenhauer Quotes about Life


“Every time a man is begotten and born, the clock of human life is wound up anew to repeat once more its same old tune that has already been played innumerable times, movement by movement and measure by measure, with insignificant variations.”

– Arthur Schopenhauer, as quoted in The World as Will and Representation


“In youth it is the outward aspect of things that most engages us; while in age, thought or reflection is the predominating quality of the mind. Hence, youth is the time for poetry, and age is more inclined to philosophy. In practical affairs it is the same: a man shapes his resolutions in youth more by the impression that the outward world makes upon him; whereas, when he is old, it is thought that determines his actions.”

– Arthur Schopenhauer, as quoted in Counsels and Maxims


“In general admittedly the Wise of all times have always said the same thing, and the fools, that is to say the vast majority of all times, have always done the same thing, i.e. the opposite; and so it will remain in the future.”

– Arthur Schopenhauer, as quoted in Aphorisms on the Wisdom of Life


“If you feel irritated by the absurd remarks of two people whose conversation you happen to overhear, you should imagine that you are listening to a dialogue of two fools in a comedy.”

– Arthur Schopenhauer, as quoted in Counsels and MaximsT. B. Saunders, trans., § 38


“Newspapers are the second hand of history. This hand, however, is usually not only of inferior metal to the other hands, it also seldom works properly.”

– Arthur Schopenhauer, as quoted in Counsels and Maxims, Vol. 2, Ch. 19, § 233


“Because people have no thoughts to deal in, they deal cards, and try and win one another’s money. Idiots!”

 – Arthur Schopenhauer


“In our monogamous part of the world, to marry means to halve one’s rights and double one’s duties.”

– Arthur Schopenhauer, as quoted in Counsels and Maxims, Vol. 2, Ch. 27, § 370


“We see in tragedy the noblest men, after a long conflict and suffering, finally renounce forever all the pleasure of life and the aims till then pursued so keenly, or cheerfully and willingly give up life itself.”

– Arthur Schopenhauer, as quoted in The World as Will and Representation


“Life is a business that does not cover the costs.”

– Arthur Schopenhauer, as quoted in The World as Will and Representation


“Memory works like the collection glass in the Camera obscura: it gathers everything together and therewith produces a far more beautiful picture than was present originally.”

– Arthur Schopenhauer, as quoted in Aphorisms on the Wisdom of Life


“One can forget everything, everything, only not oneself, one’s own being.”

– Arthur Schopenhauer, as quoted in Aphorisms on the Wisdom of Life


“Mostly it is loss which teaches us about the worth of things.”

– Arthur Schopenhauer, as quoted in Aphorisms on the Wisdom of Life


“We forfeit three-fourths of ourselves in order to be like other people.”

Arthur Schopenhauer, As attributed in Dictionary of Quotations from Ancient and Modern English and Foreign Sources (1899) by James Wood

“For our improvement we need a mirror.”

– Arthur Schopenhauer, as quoted in Aphorisms on the Wisdom of Life


“A man’s face as a rule says more, and more interesting things, than his mouth, for it is a compendium of everything his mouth will ever say, in that it is the monogram of all this man’s thoughts and aspirations.”

– Arthur Schopenhauer, as quoted in Counsels and Maxims, Vol. 2, Ch. 29, § 377


“That the outer man is a picture of the inner, and the face an expression and revelation of the whole character, is a presumption likely enough in itself, and therefore a safe one to go on; borne out as it is by the fact that people are always anxious to see anyone who has made himself famous …. Photography … offers the most complete satisfaction of our curiosity.”

– Arthur Schopenhauer, as quoted in Counsels and Maxims, Vol. 2, Ch. 29, § 377

“If there is anything in the world that can really be called a man’s property, it is surely that which is the result of his mental activity.”

– Arthur Schopenhauer, Unverified attribution noted in Respectfully Quoted: A Dictionary of Quotations (1993)


“There is only one healing force, and that is nature; in pills and ointments there is none. At most they can give the healing force of nature a hint about where there is something for it to do.”

– Arthur Schopenhauer

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Arthur Schopenhauer Quotes about Morality & Ethics


“Compassion is the basis of all morality.”

– Arthur Schopenhauer, As attributed in Thesaurus of Epigrams : A New Classified Collection of Witty Remarks, Bon Mots and Toasts


“If a person is stupid, we excuse him by saying that he cannot help it; but if we attempted to excuse in precisely the same way the person who is bad, we should be laughed at.”

– Arthur Schopenhauer, as quoted in The World as Will and Representation


“The animals are much more content with mere existence than we are; the plants are wholly so; and man is so according to how dull and insensitive he is. The animal’s life consequently contains less suffering but also less pleasure than the human’s, the direct reason being that on the one hand it is free from care and anxiety and the torments that attend them, but on the other is without hope and therefore has no share in that anticipation of a happy future which, together with the enchanting products of the imagination which accompany it, is the source of most of our greatest joys and pleasures. The animal lacks both anxiety and hope because its consciousness is restricted to what is clearly evident and thus to the present moment: the animal is the present incarnate.”

– Arthur Schopenhauer, as quoted in Counsels and Maxims, Vol. 2 “On the Suffering of the World” as translated in Essays and Aphorisms (1970), as translated by R. J. Hollingdale


“In Christian ethics … animals are seen as mere things. They can therefore be used for vivisection, hunting, coarsing, bull-fights and horse-races and can be whipped to death as they struggle along with their heavy carts of stone. Shame on such a morality that fails to recognise the eternal essence that exists in every living thing and shines forth with inscrutable significance from all eyes that see the sun.”

– Arthur Schopenhauer, On the Basis of Morality


 “All the cruelty and torment of which the world is full is in fact merely the necessary result of the totality of the forms under which the will to live is objectified.”

– Arthur Schopenhauer, as quoted in Counsels and Maxims, Vol. 2, Ch. 14, § 164

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Arthur Schopenhauer Quotes about Philosophy & Truth


“In the sphere of thought, absurdity and perversity remain the masters of the world, and their dominion is suspended only for brief periods.”

– Arthur Schopenhauer, “The Art of Controversy” as translated by T. Bailey Saunders


“The discovery of truth is prevented more effectively, not by the false appearance things present and which mislead into error, not directly by weakness of the reasoning powers, but by preconceived opinion, by prejudice.”

– Arthur Schopenhauer, as quoted in Counsels and Maxims, Vol. 2, Ch. 1, § 17


“In every page of David Hume, there is more to be learned than from Hegel’s, Herbart’s and Schleiermacher’s complete philosophical works.”

– Arthur Schopenhauer, as quoted in The World as Will and Representation


“The charlatan takes very different shapes according to circumstances; but at bottom he is a man who cares nothing about knowledge for its own sake, and only strives to gain the semblance of it that he may use it for his own personal ends, which are always selfish and material.”

– Arthur Schopenhauer, as quoted in Parerga and Paralipomena


“The auspices for philosophy are bad if, when proceeding ostensibly on the investigation of truth, we start saying farewell to all uprightness, honesty and sincerity, and are intent only on passing ourselves off for what we are not. We then assume, like those three sophists [Fichte, Schelling and Hegel], first a false pathos, then an affected and lofty earnestness, then an air of infinite superiority, in order to impose where we despair of ever being able to convince.”

– Arthur Schopenhauer, as quoted in Sketch of a History of the Doctrine of the Ideal and the Real


“An unbiased reader, on opening one of their [Fichte’s, Schelling’s or Hegel’s] books and then asking himself whether this is the tone of a thinker wanting to instruct or that of a charlatan wanting to impress, cannot be five minutes in any doubt. … The tone of calm investigation, which had characterized all previous philosophy, is exchanged for that of unshakeable certainty, such as is peculiar to charlatanry of every kind and at all times. … From every page and every line, there speaks an endeavor to beguile and deceive the reader, first by producing an effect to dumbfound him, then by incomprehensible phrases and even sheer nonsense to stun and stupefy him, and again by audacity of assertion to puzzle him, in short, to throw dust in his eyes and mystify him as much as possible.”

– Arthur Schopenhauer, as quoted in Sketch of a History of the Doctrine of the Ideal and the Real


98 Famous Quotes By Arthur Schopenhauer That Will Make You Appreciate Life A Lot More

German philosopher and mathematician, Arthur Schopenhauer rose to prominence in the 19th century and is regarded as one of the most in-fluential philosophers of the modern world. He was born in a rich and aristocratic family and received a first class education before embarking on a career in philosophy and before long he became one of the most influential voices in Europe. In 1818, Schopenhauer published his most famous philosophical book titled ‘The World as Will and Representation’ and according to many, it ushered in a new era in philosophy following the era of Kant. His school of philosophy can best be described as being pessimistic and drew the picture of a world that might not be as rosy as people might claim. Later experts have termed it as philosophical pessimism. Schopenhauer’s theories on philosophy did not only open up a new chapter in the subject but also influenced some of the intellectual giants like Leo Tolstoy, Gustav Mahler, Friedrich Nietzsche, Jorge Luis Borges, Carl Jung and many others. Schopenhauer by all accounts was one of the biggest intellectuals to have ever lived and as such it is not a surprise that he has given a great amount of brilliant quotes. Here are a few. 

  
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- Essays and Aphorisms, Arthur Schopenhauer
  
- Parerga and Paralipomena, Arthur Schopenhauer
  
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- Studies in Pessimism: The Essays, Arthur Schopenhauer

Character

  
- The Basis of Morality, Arthur Schopenhauer
  
- Religion: A Dialogue and Other Essays, Arthur Schopenhauer
  
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Time

  
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Like

  
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Like

  
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Think

  
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Like

  
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Think

  
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- The Wisdom of Life and Counsels and Maxims, Arthur Schopenhauer

Life

  
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- Essays and Aphorisms, Arthur Schopenhauer
  
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- Schopenhauer and the Wild Years of Philosophy, Arthur Schopenhauer

Life

  
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Life

  

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