Sonnet 75 Edmund Spenser Essay

An Analysis Of The Edmund Spenser's Sonnet 75

Edmund Spenser is one of the most widely known Elizabethan poets. He often put himself in the center of his poems, expressing very personal thoughts, emotions, and convictions. Such poetry, known as 'lyric,' became popular during Spenser's time where poems were more focused on the individual. In his poem known as Sonnet 75, Spenser proclaims his love to his woman with the use of symbols, her name and heaven, external conflicts, and alliteration.

In Spenser's sonnet, he and his lover are walking along the shore of a beach where he attempts to proclaim his deep love for her by writing her name in the sand. He wants the name to be permanent to prove to her that he will forever love her, but unfortunately, the waves of the shore keep coming and washing the name away. He tries writing her name a second time, but the handwritten name again suffers the same fate and another wave comes and erases it away. Spenser includes a dialogue in his poem as the woman confronts him on what she calls a vain act, pointing out that he cannot immortalize a mortal thing like love. She continues to tell him that even if he could, she is a mortal human being and will eventually die. The poet then responds to her statements confidently, claiming that he can immortalize her virtues and his love for her in his poetry, and that when they die on earth, their love will still live and that he will write her name in the heavens where it will stay forever and they shall start a new life there together.

The main symbol of this sonnet is the name the poet wrote in the sand of shore. This written name symbolizes his love for the woman he's with, and it's the initial reason this sonnet was written. Lines two and four, where Spenser produces the images of the beach waves crashing on the coast and erasing the name, represent the first conflict in the poem. The poet has a conflict with the waves...

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Essay about analysis of Edmund Spenser's sonnet 67

906 WordsNov 16th, 20134 Pages

Edmund Spenser
Sonnet 67 Edmund Spenser’s Sonnet 67 is one of 85 sonnets from Amoretti which was written about his courtship of Elizabeth Boyle. Spenser and Boyle were married in 1594. Sonnet 67 uses a hunting themed metaphor common in 16th century England comparing the woman to a deer and the man to a huntsman in pursuit. Sonnet 67 appears to have been inspired by an earlier work by Petrarch, Rima 190, but with a different ending. In this paper we will take an in depth look at this work, also commonly referred to as “ Lyke as a Huntsman”. First we will take a look at a literal interpretation of Sonnet 67. This piece begins with a huntsman in pursuit. His stalked prey, a deer, has gotten away from him. He is tired and sick of…show more content…

“The gentle deare returnd the selfe-same way,” (Spenser ll. 7) shows that the woman comes back towards the man. Spenser uses the word deare instead of deer to allude to the metaphor of the deer actually being a woman that he cares for very much. However, she did not return to him specifically but just happened upon him in her search for someone or something else, “Thinking to quench her thirst at the next brooke” (Spenser ll. 8). Now we will look at the second half of Sonnet 67, also in a metaphorical sense. The woman sees that the man is no longer chasing after her “There she beholding me with mylder looke,” (Spenser ll. 9) and suddenly decides he might not be such a bad suitor after all “Sought not to fly, but fearelesse still did bide:” (Spencer ll.10). Spenser turns this piece around from the original Petrarch piece here. He shows that it is the woman that is in control as opposed to the man. He reaches out to her nervously because she has been running from him all this time and now she seems to be encouraging and wanting his affections. He appears hopeful that his sentiments will be well received by the woman and at the same time fearful of rejection. But she allows him to court her now and encourages him to love her instead of playing hard to get and running off again “Till I in hand her yet halfe trembling tooke, / And with her owne goodwill hir fyrmely tyde” (Spenser ll. 11 and 12). The man then thinks that it seems very odd to see the woman who

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